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yerawizardharry:

Our solar systems movement between February 22nd to March 5th, 2011

yerawizardharry:

Our solar systems movement between February 22nd to March 5th, 2011

handcarryonly:

Jewels in the South Pacific: A view of Fiji from the air.

The stunningly diverse landscape below me was hard to comprehend, a heady swirl of a million shades of blues and greens and browns, it was at times hard to tell where the horizon was, where the sea ended and where the sky began. The doors of the chopper were wide open, and the wind was lashing against my face. The sun was still quite low in the sky, casting shadows on the landscape, the perfectly blue sea offered up its treasure trove - a million sparkling diamonds on the surface. Clichéd, but truly this was Paradise.

Check out my aerial video of Fiji and the rest of the Fiji series.

Oh, I know this area… I got robbed while walking down that street. They took my cellphone too.

Getting dropped off by the cabbie in the new ‘hood.

Thug Life.

(via andrew)

manpodcast:

Larry Bell, no title, 1969. As installed in “14 Sculptors: The Industrial Edge,” Dayton’s Auditorium, Walker Art Center, 1969. Photograph courtesy Walker Art Center.
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Larry Bell, who joins me to discuss his career as one of the foremost sculptors of the post-war period. Bell, 72, was a key pivot between hard-edge painting, light-and-space, and minimalism, which Bell anticipated in his sculpture of the late 1950s. Bell’s work is in the collection of virtually every major museum of modern and contemporary art.
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. To see images of the works discussed in this week’s show — many of which haven’t been published in years, even decades — visit Modern Art Notes.

manpodcast:

Larry Bell, no title, 1969. As installed in “14 Sculptors: The Industrial Edge,” Dayton’s Auditorium, Walker Art Center, 1969. Photograph courtesy Walker Art Center.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Larry Bell, who joins me to discuss his career as one of the foremost sculptors of the post-war period. Bell, 72, was a key pivot between hard-edge painting, light-and-space, and minimalism, which Bell anticipated in his sculpture of the late 1950s. Bell’s work is in the collection of virtually every major museum of modern and contemporary art.

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. To see images of the works discussed in this week’s show — many of which haven’t been published in years, even decades — visit Modern Art Notes.

vimeo:

FEIST - The bad in each other by martin de thurah

The many narratives of Martin de Thurah’s new music video for Feist create something mysterious and intentionally incomplete, yet also undeniably touching. On her website, Leslie Feist herself offers this insight: ”This video captures glimpses of something human, we get a peek inside something real between people — could be loss, longing, and love… It is told in a way where it opens up more aspects than it concludes.”

understatementblog:

The announcement that Nexus One users won’t be getting upgraded to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich led some to justifiably question Google’s support of their devices. I look at it a little differently: Nexus One owners are lucky. I’ve been researching the history of OS updates on Android phones…

Letter from Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook CEO, in social network’s IPO filing

producermatthew:

Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission — to make the world more open and connected.
 
We think it’s important that everyone who invests in Facebook understands what this mission means to us, how we make decisions and why we do the things we do. I will try to outline our approach in this letter.
 
At Facebook, we’re inspired by technologies that have revolutionized how people spread and consume information. We often talk about inventions like the printing press and the television — by simply making communication more efficient, they led to a complete transformation of many important parts of society. They gave more people a voice. They encouraged progress. They changed the way society was organized. They brought us closer together.
 
Today, our society has reached another tipping point. We live at a moment when the majority of people in the world have access to the internet or mobile phones — the raw tools necessary to start sharing what they’re thinking, feeling and doing with whomever they want. Facebook aspires to build the services that give people the power to share and help them once again transform many of our core institutions and industries.
 
There is a huge need and a huge opportunity to get everyone in the world connected, to give everyone a voice and to help transform society for the future. The scale of the technology and infrastructure that must be built is unprecedented, and we believe this is the most important problem we can focus on.

Read More

staff:

Tumblr iPhone 2.0: Now available on the App Store

We’re excited about this one! The app has been recoded, rewired, and rethought from the ground up to offer you the very best Tumblr experience:

  • Brand new interface: Browsing your dashboard, creating a post, managing multiple blogs — the most important features are within reach so you can interact with Tumblr effortlessly while you’re on-the-go.
  • Creating a post: Now easier than ever! Sharing photos, videos, links, chats, text, quotes and audio is front and center. Advanced options like saving drafts and queuing posts are one swipe away.
  • Messages: View and reply to messages for each of your blogs.
  • Address book: Find people to follow from your phone’s address book.
  • New users: Signing up is now native inside the app. 

There are tons more features and details that are awesomely crafted.

Check it out on the App Store!

So last month I wrote a bit about setting up your own personal Git repositories on a Linux box, and how to use that for sharing code.

I’ve had a slight epiphany since then: what if I just used the awesome Dropbox (my referral link, if you’re likely to sign up) to share Git repositories…

ourpresidents:

Yes, this is a periodic table of the New Deal.
On June 16, 1933, the period known as FDR’s First 100 Days came to an end. During this time Roosevelt had issued proclamations and executive orders and pushed a steady stream of legislation through Congress to relieve economic hardship, stimulate recovery, and forge reforms. 
As FDR put it, “The country needs and… the country demands bold, persistent experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.”
To help navigate the myriad programs, players and events surrounding the New Deal, the FDR Library’s Education Chemist, er, we mean, Education Specialist has devised a Periodic Table of the New Deal. The table includes definitions and descriptions of the many programs and so-called alphabet agencies created during the New Deal.  To get the full features of this interactive guide we recommend exploring it here.
For more information about the start of the New Deal here’s a guide to a recent Special Exhibition at the FDR Library & Museum: Action, and Action Now: FDR’s First 100 Days. 
What alphabet agencies do you recognize from the table?

ourpresidents:

Yes, this is a periodic table of the New Deal.

On June 16, 1933, the period known as FDR’s First 100 Days came to an end. During this time Roosevelt had issued proclamations and executive orders and pushed a steady stream of legislation through Congress to relieve economic hardship, stimulate recovery, and forge reforms.

As FDR put it, “The country needs and… the country demands bold, persistent experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.”

To help navigate the myriad programs, players and events surrounding the New Deal, the FDR Library’s Education Chemist, er, we mean, Education Specialist has devised a Periodic Table of the New Deal. The table includes definitions and descriptions of the many programs and so-called alphabet agencies created during the New Deal.  To get the full features of this interactive guide we recommend exploring it here.

For more information about the start of the New Deal here’s a guide to a recent Special Exhibition at the FDR Library & Museum: Action, and Action Now: FDR’s First 100 Days

What alphabet agencies do you recognize from the table?